Hancock table
Hancock table copper top view
Hancock table leg detail view

Hancock Table

Regular price $7,900.00 Save Liquid error (product-template line 131): -Infinity%
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The Hancock dining table is a trestle-style table design that springboards off the traditional furniture found at the Shaker settlement at Hancock, Massachusetts.

The top and base are solid cherry (images shown), wedged at the stretcher with bocote wedges bearing on large aluminum pins; the top captured with dovetail key blocks of padauk. The legs are joined with a series of exposed splines of bocote. The top has a central “runner” of 24 gauge copper patined with browns and greens to contrast with the rich, red cherry. The copper is useful for setting serving pieces, as well as glasses that might be wet, hot or rough on the bottom. This saves wear and tear on the wood of the table top itself.

This dining table may be customized in size, and is also available in walnut, birch or maple. Zinc may also be used as the runner and patined either to a warm gray, or with a pattern of rich dark-gray-to-black with warm brown markings. Made to order.
78"L x 39"W x 29"H

Ships within 6 weeks.



STATEMENT
Iʼm excited by the natural qualities of materials: the record of life seen in the grain of wood, its variety of colors, its visual depth, its welcoming of the hand; by the surface of copper reacting to every touch; by the ability of aluminum to capture the mark of every tool used to shape it. I like the qualities these and other materials bring to the function of a piece. I like the fact that structure and joinery can be used to enhance the lines of a piece and add excitement and depth. I like starting with a traditional form, playing with it, maybe adding a contemporary sensibility to it, using materials perhaps not traditionally available. And sometime I just like a purity of form that comments on itself, its function, and the space it occupies.

BIOGRAPHY
Scott Wynn brings a lifetime of involvement in craft, art, design, and the practice of building to his work. A third generation craftsman, he began his training in drawing and painting at the age of 8, and as well, demonstrated an early aptitude for building things in his fatherʼs workshop. As a result, he eventually studied architecture— that perfect synthesis of art and building — graduating from the University of Cincinnati in 1973.
He has worked nearly continually in craft since high school. In college, he taught himself how to make musical instruments and sold his second guitar. He developed an interest in ceramics and worked for a few years after graduation as a professional potter. His interest in furniture was first piqued in college and he has maintained a professional shop providing furniture, cabinetry, and woodcarving since 1976.

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Scott has been a licensed builder since 1978 and a licensed Architect since 1983. While he has also has a broad base of experience in building, millwork, and period restoration, he now focuses on custom woodwork and furniture, limited production furniture, and architectural design.