Katy Kidd

  • “The third world- the “other” world- worthy only of contempt or pity. In the interest of good taste, not often mentioned.” 
    -Edouardo Galeano, from the book Sabastiao Salgado, An uncertain Grace

    Used tires, Plastic Jerry Cans, Plastic Basins, Plastic Chairs, Plants, Fire, Falling Blossoms, Snow, Tribal Beads, Prayer Beads, Chickens, slums, abandoned vehicles and Bright Colors. these items used in my landscape paintings come from my travels to Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, urban & rural America and beyond.

    My work is a social/environmental commentary on objects from our beauty obsessed, petroleum based, wasteful society. Ubiquitous Objects we label as “tacky”, “garbage”,  “cast aways” or “environmentally harmful” are so prominent in developing countries and are considered useful timesavers, long lasting and in the case of the Jerry Can, a life saver. Many places in Africa, hauling water is a day long chore often covering miles and the plastic jerry can is lightweight and can hold many precious drops.
      
    In painting these subjects I give you a glimpse of how I see things as environmentally, socially and politically complicated. A tangle of poison and purity, beauty and repugnancy, prosperity and poverty, hope and anguish.
  • Katy Kidd was raised in an art collecting family in Denver during the 70's and 80's where she studied art in the public schools and The Art Students League of Denver. In the 90's she graduated with a BFA from The Evergreen State College. She has worked as an assistant to ceramic artist Jack Charney, Handbag designer Susan Todd, and Environmental Activist Artists, Helen Mayer Harrison and Newton Harrison during their installation entitled "Santa Fe Watershed: Lessons From The Genius Of Place".
     
    She presently works in the field of fine art conservation with artist and conservator John Andolsek. Her studio is nestled in an historic orchard filled valley following the mighty Santa Fe river. She lives in the mountains with her husband, two kids, Max the dog and packs of coyotes.
  • Katy's work has been shown in Missouri, Washington, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Oregon. Her work was in the film "Husband for Hire" featuring 80’s heart throb Eric Estrada. Her art is in many private collections around the country as well as The Lama Foundation and the Western Washington Cancer Treatment Center.
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